English Language Arts
CourseDescription
English Language Arts 7*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7
Students grow as readers, writers, and thinkers in this middle school course. With engaging literary and informational texts, students learn to think critically, analyze an author’s language, and cite evidence to support ideas. Students complete an in-depth study of Jack London’s classic novel White Fang, and read excerpts from other stories, poetry, and nonfiction. Explicit modeling and ample opportunities for practice help students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills. Students also respond routinely to texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.
English Language Arts 8*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 8
In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of
literary and informational text engages students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence
to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit
modeling and ample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more
extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, and analytical.
English Language Arts 9*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9
Dedicated to creating effective and adaptable readers and writers, provides rigorous training in the foundations of English Language Arts skills and strategies. Using the core foundation, the course expands on and applies traditional concepts to modern, 21st-century demands. Offering practical lessons in techniques such as visualizing, making inferences and predictions and recognizing, organizational patterns in online and offline texts, this course delivers hands-on training in applying the writing process, evaluating essays, and using MLA style and documentation. Over the course of two semesters, interactive grammar lessons will strengthen students’ grasp of language and improve writing skills.
English Language Arts 10*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 10
Focused on application, this sophomore English course reinforces literary analysis and 21st-century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, 21st-century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Under the guidance of the eWriting software, students will also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays.
English Language Arts 11*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11
This junior-year English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students will master the comprehension and literary analysis strategies that the Common Core State Standards require. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.
English Language Arts 12
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 12
This senior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.
College Prep Writing
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 12
Motivating students in grades nine through twelve to become more articulate and effective writers, this one-semester course offers hands-on experience writing personal reflections, definition essays, research essays, persuasive essays, informative essays, and literary analysis essays. Offering targeted lessons on reputable research, effective communication, solid grammar, and compelling style, this one-semester course utilizes the Six Traits of Effective Writing as an overarching framework. Students enrolled in this course develop the skills necessary to evaluate their own writing and articulate and apply writing and researching strategies. In addition, students get further practice applying the grammatical rules of Standard American English in formal writing.
College Prep Literature
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 12
This is a college preparation reading course. Vocabulary, reading comprehension, and reading strategy skills will be built through reading several college prep. novels and completing/presenting projects and discussions about each assigned novel.
Creative Writing
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This course asks students to write creatively. Students will be asked to write often and will look to articles, stories, and poetry for inspiration.

Mathematics
CourseDescription
Math 7*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7
This course begins with an in-depth study of proportional reasoning during which students utilize concrete models such as bar
diagrams and tables to increase and develop conceptual understanding of rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Students’
number fluency and understanding of the rational number system are extended as they perform operations with signed rational
numbers embedded in real-world contexts. In statistics, students develop meanings for representative samples, measures of
central tendency, variation, and the ideal representation for comparisons of given data sets. Students develop an understanding
of both theoretical and experimental probability. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and
equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multi-step equations and
inequalities. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding
lengths between objects. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and
three-dimensional figures.
Math 8*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 8
The course begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations, and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions. Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean Theorem, distance, and volume.
Secondary Math I*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9
This course formalizes and extends middle-school mathematics, deepening their understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between Algebra and Geometry on the coordinate plane.
Secondary Math II*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 10
This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.

Prerequisite: Secondary Math I.

Secondary Math III*
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11
This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles, developing the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

Prerequisite: Secondary Math I and II.

Pre-Calculus
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
Exploring the relationship between advanced algebra topics and trigonometry, Pre-Calculus is an informative introduction to calculus that challenges students to discover the nature of graphs, nonlinear systems, and polynomial and rational functions. With an emphasis on mathematicalreasoning and argument, this advanced course scaffolds rigorous content with clear instruction and an array of scaffolds for learning, providing students with a deep understanding of topics such as matrices, functions, graphing, logarithms, vectors, and conics. The course concludes with a brief introduction to calculus that exposes students to limits, continuity, derivatives, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

Prerequisite: Secondary Math I, II and III.

Math for Personal Finance
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill sets, including percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems, and exponential functions.

Prerequisite: Secondary Math I and II.

College Prep Math
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 12
College Prep Math formalizes and reinforces concepts from the Secondary Mathematics series to provide students with the foundational skills and understanding prerequisite to College Algebra (1050). Students will reason abstractly and quantitatively while solving linear and quadratic equations and linear inequalities. They will efficiently use polynomial and rational expressions and functions, radicals and complex numbers, and exponential and logarithmic expressions and functions to model and solve mathematical problems. They will explore conic sections and represent parabolic data. Throughout this course, students will make sense of problems and persevere in solving them, use tools strategically, and attend to precision.

Prerequisite: Secondary Math I, II and III.

Science
CourseDescription
Integrated Science 7
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7
Examining a broad spectrum of the biological sciences, SC1112 is a two-semester course for middle school students that builds on basic principles of scientific inquiry and translates those skills to more
complex overarching biological themes. The course includes units that help students understand the definition, forms, and classifications of living organisms and learn to analyze the diversity of each
unique group of living organisms. Other units introduce students to the structures and functions of cells, cell theory, and cell reproduction. These larger themes are then applied to other topics, such as genetics, Darwinian theory, and human biology and health. An introduction of ecology draws all of these concepts together to examine the interrelationships that help to maintain life on Earth.
Integrated Science 8
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 8
Encompassing the branch of science that studies nonliving systems, SC1114 is an exciting high school-level course that inspires students to explore key concepts and theories, each of which
explains and/or models a particular aspect of the behavior of nature. Students enrolled in this two semester course examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the dynamic properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects these phenomena exhibit on the planet. A cumulative study of how each of these concepts elicits reactions across the solar system rounds out this dynamic course.
Earth Systems
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Students enrolled in this dynamic course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. Intended for middle school students, Earth Systems is a two- semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.
Biology
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This compelling two-semester course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a year-long course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology.
Chemistry
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
This rigorous full-year course engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes 18 virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher-order thinking applications. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications to understand chemistry problems, and applications of chemistry in the real world.
This course is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards, as well as the Common Core Standards for Literacy in Science, History, and the Technical Subjects.

Prerequisite: Secondary Math II.

Physics
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
Combining scientific inquiry with advanced mathematics, is a stimulating, two-semester high school-level course that will challenge students to understand and explain how energy, matter, and motion are all related. Engaging lessons introduce theories and experiments and encourage students to develop the knowledge and understanding necessary to support conclusions with numerical results. Inspiring students to relate knowledge to real-world applications, the course connects basic principles to more complex ideas in many fascinating areas: thermal energy,vibrations and waves, light and refraction, sound, electricity, and magnetism.

Prerequisite: Secondary Math II.

Environmental Science
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Environmental science is a captivating and rapidly expanding field, and SC2028 offers compelling lessons that cover many different aspects of the field: ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Through unique activities and material, high school students connect scientific theory and concepts to current, real-world dilemmas, providing them with opportunities for mastery in each of the segments throughout the semester.
Astronomy
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
This course will provide the student with an introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy, the origin and history of the Universe and the formation of the Earth and the solar system. Students will compare the Earth’s properties with those of the other planets and explore how the heavens have influenced human thought and action. The course gives a description of astronomical phenomena using the laws of physics. The course treats many standard topics including planets, stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, black holes to more esoteric questions concerning the origin of the universe and its evolution and fate.
Human Physiology
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
This yearlong course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the
organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the
major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide
students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.

Social Studies
CourseDescription
Utah History 7
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7
Core class for 7th grade students. It is designed to help students understand the state of Utah at a deeper level by reviewing Utah’s early history and particularly emphasizing Utah from statehood to the present.
US History 8
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 8
Exploring the structure of the United States government on a national, state, and local level, this course challenges students to learn and
understand fundamental concepts and philosophies that led to the creation of the United States Constitution. Students enrolled in thistwo-semester course analyze the political process, political parties, and influences that affect them both. Engaging, interactive content introduces economic concepts and encourages students to explore government and economics on a global scale. By instilling a thorough understanding of government and economics, this course inspires students to investigate what it means to be an American citizen.
Geography*
.05 or 1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Examining current global issues that impact our world today takes, a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this high school-level course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students’ understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems—from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution—this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.
World Civilizations*
0.5 or 1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.
US History
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
This course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the Era of Exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped U.S. history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization as they assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives.
US Government
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its Amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy approaches. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.
Psychology
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
This course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.
Sociology
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging, one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course, designed for high school students, covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times.
Economics
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
This semester-long course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.

The Arts
CourseDescription
Art Foundations I
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history,this course encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. This course course provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art and visual elements and principles of art. This course includes a series of hands-on, application art projects that follow the elements of design.
Art History
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This one-semester course is a further exploration of art appreciation and covers beginning of art history.This course course discusses the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400. This course includes a series of hand-on, application art projects that complement the topics of art and art history discussed.
Drawing II / Foundations II
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, Art History offers high school students an in depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course will cover topics including early Medieval and Romanesque art; art in the 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries; 15th-century art in Europe;16th-century art in Italy; the master artists; high Renaissance and Baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; 18th- and 19th-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas.
Animation S1
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
This course will introduce students to 3D-modeling tools and concepts. Using Blender, the popular open-source 3D-modeling package, students will learn the basics of creating shapes, adding textures and lighting, and rendering. By the end of the course, students will have produced a series of increasingly sophisticated projects for their 3D portfolio, such as a house, a creature, and terrain. This course is suitable for students with no prior experience with 3D game design or digital media authoring tools, but it is recommended for students who are older. The course uses a difficult software program, and prior experience in 3D software may be helpful. Also, student computer speeds will greatly affect how long the course will take to complete.
Animation S2
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
In this second‐semester course, students will build on the 3D‐modeling concepts and Blendersoftware skills developed in 3D Art I to learn intermediate to advanced 3D‐animation techniques.Using Blender, the world’s most powerful open‐source modeling tool, students will master the basics of animation—trajectory, lighting, bones, and movement—while learning how to apply traditional animation techniques to their 3D models. By the end of the course, students will have a solid foundation for pursuing further 3D modeling and animation projects. This course is suitable for students with no prior experience with 3D game design or digital media authoring tools, but it is recommended for students who are older. The course uses a difficult software program, and prior experience in 3D software may be helpful. Also, student computer speeds will greatly affect how long the course will take to complete.

Prerequisite: Animation S1

Commercial Art / Computer Graphics I
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
In the first semester of this introductory digital arts course sequence, students will learn the seven elements of visual art: line, shape, form, color, value, space, and texture. The course highlights
historical artwork, focusing on the ways in which artists have used specific elements of visual art in a variety of ways. After surveying a variety of media and art, students will use digital drawing to apply the elements of visual art in their own work. Students will use Inkscape, the popular open‐source vector‐graphics software program, to complete the course projects. Students will discover career opportunities in the design, production, display, and presentation of digital artwork. Students will respond to the artwork of others and learn how to combine artistic elements to create finished pieces that effectively communicate ideas. The course assignments build toward a finished still‐life drawing that incorporates all seven elements of visual art.
Commercial Art / Computer Graphics II
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
In the second semester of this introductory digital arts course sequence, students will build on the skills and concepts learned in Digital Arts I to develop further a vocabulary of digital design elements. Digital Arts II includes a review of the skills and concepts learned in Digital Arts I to support the more advanced techniques described in the course. Students will learn about the principles of design and use them to create their own unique artworks. The principles of design include repetition, pattern, contrast, variety, movement, rhythm, proportion, balance, emphasis, dominance, unity, and harmony.By the end of the course, students will have created a collection of digital art projects for a digital design portfolio. This course also uses Inkscape. Assignments instruct students in analyzing the use of principles of design in specific artworks, as well as assignments that support using those principles in student work.
Astronomy
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
This course will provide the student with an introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy, the origin and history of the Universe and the formation of the Earth and the solar system. Students will compare the Earth’s properties with those of the other planets and explore how the heavens have influenced human thought and action. The course gives a description of astronomical phenomena using the laws of physics. The course treats many standard topics including planets, stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, black holes to more esoteric questions concerning the origin of the universe and its evolution and fate.
Photography
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This course will teach students the basic of digital photography. Elements of design, composition, mood, and perspective will be taught through the lens of a camera.
Requirements: A digital camera capable of taking pictures 8 megapixels or higher, includes a zoom feature, and is able to transfer pictures to a computer to edit and submit for grading.
Beginning Guitar
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This innovative distance learning guitar course covers the core knowledge necessary to progress quickly and confidently as a guitarist and musician. At the end of the course, you’ll have learned open position and movable chords, strum and accompaniment patterns, pick and beginning fingerpicking patterns, basic music theory applied to creating songs, and a chord tone based introduction to guitar improvisation that really works. Styles of music include folk, blues & rock, Spanish guitar, reggae, jazz and traditional. The guitar method is designed to ensure success. Each lesson uses the proven PDA (Present, Drill, and Apply) approach of instruction. What that means is that each skill is first clearly presented in its own video, next you’ll use practice drills with accompaniment tracks to help you perfect the new skill, finally, you apply the skill in performing solo and ensemble compositions.
Guitar II
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This innovative distance learning guitar course covers the core knowledge necessary to progress quickly and confidently as a guitarist and musician. At the end of the course, you’ll have learned open position and movable chords, strum and accompaniment patterns, pick and beginning fingerpicking patterns, basic music theory applied to creating songs, and a chord tone based introduction to guitar improvisation that really works. Styles of music include folk, blues & rock, Spanish guitar, reggae, jazz and traditional. The guitar method is designed to ensure success. Each lesson uses the proven PDA (Present, Drill, and Apply) approach of instruction. What that means is that each skill is first clearly presented in its own video, next you’ll use practice drills with accompaniment tracks to help you perfect the new skill, finally, you apply the skill in performing solo and ensemble compositions.

Physical and Health Ed.
CourseDescription
Physical Education
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Physical Education is a course which combines a wide range of health and fitness concepts, creating a comprehensive exploration of all aspects of wellness. The course uses pedagogical planning to ensure that as students investigate fitness and physical health, they are also learning about the nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle. The course fulfills both health and physical education standards at the state and national level.
Health I
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Health I is a course which combines a wide range of health and fitness concepts, creating a comprehensive exploration of all aspects of wellness. The course uses pedagogical planning to ensure that as students investigate fitness and physical health, they are also learning about the nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle. The course fulfills both health and physical education standards at the state and national level.
Fitness for Life
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Exploring fitness topics such as safe exercise and injury prevention, nutrition and weight management, consumer product evaluation, and stress management, EL2083 equips high schoolstudents with the skills they need to achieve lifetime fitness. Throughout this one-semester course, students assess individual fitness levels according to the five components of physical fitness: cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Personal fitness assessments encourage students to design fitness programs to meet their individual fitness goals.
Health II
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
Encouraging students to make responsible, respectful, informed, and capable decisions about topics that affect the well-being of themselves and others, EL2081 is a one-semester course that provides students with comprehensive information they can use to develop healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Designed for high school students, this informative and engaging course encourages students to recognize that they have the power to choose healthy behaviors to reduce risks.
Physical Skills
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This Physical Education course is designed to help students gain an understanding of the essential knowledge and skills needed to participate in physical activities that promote individual well-being. Many aspects of healthy living will be covered throughout the course. Some of the main topics discussed include physical fitness, nutrition, healthy peer relationships, stress management, weight and strength training, etc.
Weight Training
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This course focuses on the principles of overload and hypertrophy in order to improve performance in explosive and strength activities as well as overall health and fitness. Students will learn the fundamental principles behind strength and explosive training through the course material and live discussions and apply them by participating in various exercises that they will record and submit for credit. This course offers a wide variety self-differentiating activities that help students use the principles of weight training in a way that best suits their fitness and sport goals.
Individualized Lifetime Activities
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This semester class will help students understand the importance of developing and maintaining an active lifestyle. As a result of this class, students will know how to make positive choices to improve health and fitness. It will focus on developing and/or enhancing the student’s routine participation in aerobic activities to increase cardio-respiratory and muscular endurance. Participants in this class will engage in daily activities and consistently maintain activity logs.

Career and Tech Education
CourseDescription
FACS Exploration
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
This course provides students the opportunity to develop essential skills in the various career pathways related to Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS). Students will explore and cultivate skills in food and nutrition sciences, childcare, interior design, clothing and textile construction, fashion design and merchandising, consumerism, entrepreneurship, family relationships, personal responsibility, and career and job-related tasks. This course will strengthen comprehension of concepts and standards outlined in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education.
Exploring Business and Marketing
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
In this semester long introductory course, students learn the principles of business using real‐world examples—learning what it
takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to
economics, costs and profit, and different business types. Students are introduced to techniques for managing money, personally
and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society both locally and
globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to
that opportunity.
Keyboarding I
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-9
This course will help students learn the basics skills of typing. They will learn the proper hand position, and set
goals to increase their words per minute.
Keyboarding II
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This course will help students continue to improve typing skills as well as learn ten key function.
College and Career Awareness
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
College and Career Awareness offers exploration and preparation in college and career pathways focusing on jobs that are high skill and high demand, as well as satisfying and financially rewarding. The College and Career Awareness course is designed to help students identify their interests, abilities, and skills. With appropriate developmental information related to careers, educational pathways, and self-knowledge, students are able to begin to make college and career goals for the future. College and Career Awareness is designed to acquaint students with the Utah labor market and the employment opportunities for which they can prepare by defining a College and Career Ready Plan.
Entrepreneurship-Marketing
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
This semester class will help students understand the importance of developing and maintaining an active lifestyle. As a result of this class, students will know how to make positive choices to improve health and fitness. It will focus on developing and/or enhancing the student’s routine participation in aerobic activities to increase cardio-respiratory and muscular endurance. Participants in this class will engage in daily activities and consistently maintain activity logs.
Adult Roles and Responsibilities
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 11-12
This course prepares students to understand human relationships involving individuals and families. Topics include: career and workforce preparation, family, parenting, money management, decision making skills, communication skills, self-awareness, crisis management, and individual roles and responsibilities within the family, community and workforce. This course will strengthen comprehension of concepts and standards outlined in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education.
Exploring Business and Marketing
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9
In this semester long introductory course, students learn the principles of business using real‐world examples—learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economics, costs and profit, and different business types. Students are introduced to techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society both locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity.
Business Management
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
In this introductory course, students learn the principles of business using real‐world examples—learning what it
takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economics, costs and profit, and different business types. Students are introduced to techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society both locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity.
Orientation and Exploration (Careers)
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-10
Introducing high school students to the working world, this course provides the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today’s challenging job market. This relevant and timely course helps students investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, develop skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce, explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. This one-semester course includes lessons in which students create a self-assessment profile, a cover letter, and a résumé that can be used in their educational or career portfolio.
Foods and Nutrition I
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This course is designed to focus on the science of food and nutrition. Experiences will include food safety and sanitation, culinary technology, food preparation and dietary analysis to develop a healthy life style with pathways to career readiness. Laboratory based experiences strengthen comprehension of concepts and standards outlined in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education.
Child Development
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
This course provides students with an understanding of the aspects of human growth and development. Parenting skills are developed as positive guidance techniques and child-related issues are studied. Learning activities, observation techniques, and lab experiences in working with young children may be included.
Business Office Specialist
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
This course reviews and builds upon skills acquired in the Microsoft Word unit in Computer Technology and Word Processing skills. As students create a variety of documents, increased efficiency, productivity, quality, and creativity will be evident through their use of basic and advanced software features. Instruction on proper keyboarding technique and recommended styles for business documents will coincide with their software training. Upon completion of the course, students should be ready to take the Microsoft Office Specialist certification test.
Computer Programming I
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
An introductory course in computer programming/software engineering and applications. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students will learn to design, code, and test their own programs while applying mathematical concepts. Teachers introduce concepts and problem solving skills to beginning students through a programming language such as C++, C#, Java, Python, or JavaScript. The second half of the year reviews and builds on the concepts introduced in the first semester. This semester introduces students to more complex data structures and their uses, including sequential files, arrays, and classes. Students will learn to create more powerful programs.

World Languages
CourseDescription
French 1
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Students in middle school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.
French 2
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Middle school students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.
Spanish 1
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Middle school students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.
Spanish 2
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Students in middle school continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.
Spanish I
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.
Spanish II
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
High school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.
Spanish III
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
In this expanding engagement with French, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language
acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in
French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in
the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing
vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural
presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.
French I
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Students in high school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign
language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new
vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening
comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking
areas in Europe and across the globe.
French II
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Students continue their introduction to French in this second-year, high school language course with review of fundamental
building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit
consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing
vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations
covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments.
French III
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
In this expanding engagement with French, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

Academic Support / Electives
CourseDescription
Secondary Reading
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
This course is a year long, intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high-interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. This course offers an
engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction
with the use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts.
Basic Academic Skills
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 7-8
Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, this one-semester course encourages high school and middle school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.
Secondary Reading
1.0 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This course is a year long, intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and
writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high-interest topics to motivate students
and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. This course offers an
engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following
comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making
inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation
strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of Gradestheir learning.Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with the use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional
principles using diverse content area and real-world texts.
Online Learning and Digital Citizenship
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
This one semester course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to online learning, including how to work independently, safe safe, and develop effective study habits in virtual learning environment. Featuring direct-instruction videos, interactive tasks, authentic projects, and rigorous assessments, the course prepares students for school by providing in-depth instruction and practice in important study skills such as time management, effective note taking, test preparation, and collaborating effectively online. By the end of the course, students will understand what it takes to be successful online learners and responsible digital citizens.
ACT Prep
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 10-12
The ACT course is designed to help improve students score. The course also includes college prep strategies such as financial aid, college application, scholarships and admissions. Students taking this course have had increase in their ACT scores.

This class contains 4 sections.

Driver’s Ed.
0 credit
Grade(s):
If you’re 18 years old or younger, the Utah Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) requires you to complete a driver’s education course before you can obtain your first driver’s license.
A driver’s education course will teach you all about driving laws in Utah, how to operate a motor vehicle, and safe driving techniques.

Literacy
CourseDescription
Computer Technology
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Offering insight into the suite of products most used by working professionals, this course challenges high school students to become proficient in Microsoft® Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, and Outlook® through engaging lessons and course work. This one semester course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with tasks such as creating flyers, brochures, schedules,presentations, and mail merge.
Exploring Computer Science
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 9-12
Exploring Computer Science is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. The goal of Exploring Computer Science is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues.

This class fulfills the exploring computer technology graduation requirement.

Financial Literacy
0.5 credit
Grade(s): 1-12
This introductory finance course teaches what it takes to understand the world of finance and make informed decisions about managing finances. Students learn more about economics and become more confident in setting and researching financial goals as they develop the core skills needed to be successful. In this one-semester course, students learn how to open bank accounts, invest money, apply for loans, apply for insurance, explore careers, manage business finances, make decisions about major purchases, and more. Students will be inspired by stories from finance professionals and individuals who have reached their financial goals.